Trial of Hells Angels members accused of being part of meth ring nears end

Police raided the Hells Angels Central chapter headquarters in 2020 as part of their investigation into meth dealer Darn Gilmore.

STUFF/Stuff

Police raided the Hells Angels Central chapter headquarters in 2020 as part of their investigation into meth dealer Darn Gilmore.

A jury has been urged to look at patterns when deciding if two Hells Angels members, including a chapter president, were involved in a methamphetamine ring.

Crown prosecutor Deborah Davies​ spent much of Friday in the Palmerston North District Court closing the case against Andrew Sisson​ and Scott James Allan​.

The pair are both accused of being involved in separate conspiracies to supply meth, but with Daron Ian Charles Gilmore as a common denominator.

Gilmore, a Hells Angels member, has already admitted supplying meth in Manawatū in 2020.

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Sisson is charged with being Gilmore’s Auckland-based wholesale supplier, with drugs and cash exchanged when Gilmore made trips to locations where Sisson was.

Allan allegedly cooked meth for Gilmore once when the Covid-19 lockdown made sourcing the drug difficult and was about to cook again when police raided his Bunnythorpe home in June 2020.

Much of Davies’ closing address focused on Sisson, who the trial heard was the president of the Auckland-based Hells Angels Nomads chapter.

He, when giving evidence, said he was friends with Gilmore through the Hells Angels.

Scott James Allan, left, is accused of cooking meth as part of a conspiracy to supply the drug with fellow Hells Angels member Darn Gilmore

DAVID UNWIN/Stuff

Scott James Allan, left, is accused of cooking meth as part of a conspiracy to supply the drug with fellow Hells Angels member Darn Gilmore

But Davies said all the messages and intercepted calls between the pair showed their relationship was purely business.

Gilmore’s trips from Palmerston North to Auckland were always preceded by him collecting cash from lower level dealers, then contact with Sisson.

He would then get to where Sisson was – his phone polled in similar locations – staying for a very short time before heading back to Palmerston North, telling lower level dealers he had meth.

The cycle would then continue – collect cash, get to Sisson, exchange cash for meth, head home, tell lower level dealers he had product, then supply – for Gilmore, Davies said.

Andrew Sisson allegedly was the wholesale supplier for Manawatū meth dealer Daron Gilmore.

DAVID UNWIN/Stuff

Andrew Sisson allegedly was the wholesale supplier for Manawatū meth dealer Daron Gilmore.

Sisson told the trial he either did not meet Gilmore on the trips, or there were legitimate reasons – dropping off a sidecar or taking clothing to a Hells Angels clubhouse – which Davies said did not wash.

It made no sense to travel all the way from Palmerston North to Auckland, especially once during alert level 3 lockdown, for those reasons, Davies said.

Furthermore, having a friend like Gilmore travel from so far away would not result in such short meetings with Sisson, she said.

“They are not two mates chewing the fat.”

The pattern of text messages and calls between Gilmore, his lower level dealers and Sisson, as well as the pattern of the trips, showed Sisson was Gilmore’s supplier, she said.

“This trial is about patterns.”

Allan pleaded guilty before trial to possessing meth ingredients and equipment with the purpose of making the drug.

But it was text messages between him and others, as well as messages between Gilmore and his network of dealers, which showed Allan cooked meth in April 2020, Davies said.

One of those messages between two people stated “once a Mother, always a Mother” – something Davies said referenced Allan’s previous membership of the defunct Mothers Motorcycle Club.

Everything he was seen with when police raided him – a shipping container with various ingredients – and how it was set up showed he was on the verge of cooking again.

He was also seen throwing items from the container outside into the rain when police arrived, Davies said.

The trial continues, with defence lawyers giving their closing addresses on Monday.

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